Pop Quiz 4 Feedback

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1. In a proper warm up routine, the general warm-up usually consists of light physical activity for:
a.    2 to 5 minutes
b.    5 to 15 minutes *
c.    5 to 10 minutes
d.    20 to 30 minutes

Feedback:
a. Wrong, a 2 to 5 minute warm up routine is too short to perform a proper warm up.
b. Correct, a 5 to 15 minute warm up routine is the recommended time for a proper warm up.
c. Wrong, 5 to 10 minutes may be a little too short to complete a proper warm up.
d. Wrong, 20 to 30 minutes is too long for a warm up routine. You don’t want to be tired or excessively sweaty after a warm up. The goal is a light sweat and warm, flexible muscles.

2. A proper warm up routine should contain these elements:
(Select all that apply)
a.    Static stretching *
b.    Ballistic stretching
c.    Multiple backflips
d.    Sport-specific dynamic stretching *
e.    General warm-up *

Feedback:
a. Correct, although static stretching may be detrimental to your performance, it is recommended that a few static stretches be completed before starting dynamic stretching.
b. Wrong, ballistic stretching is not recommended due to the high risk of injury associated with the stretch. Must only be performed under professional assistance.
c. Wrong, performing multiple backflips is not recommended for a standard warm up routine.
d. Correct, sport-specific dynamic stretching is the third and final phase of the warm up routine. It is important to make sure your muscles are warm before performing dynamic stretches.
e. Correct, the general warm up is the initial phase of the warm up routine. A 5 – 15 minute light jog or fast-paced walk will suffice.


3. The act of static stretching may involve:
a.    spinning in circles with your arms above your head.
b.    touching your toes and holding it for thirty seconds. *
c.    sitting on the ground with your legged crossed.
d.    jumping up and down for ten seconds.

Feedback:
a. Wrong, spinning in circles with your arms above your head will only make you dizzy and disoriented.
b. Correct, touching your toes and holding it for thirty seconds is a good example of a static stretch.
c. Wrong, sitting on the ground with your legs crossed is not a static stretch. However, if your legs were not crossed and the soles of your feet are touching, this could seen as a groin static stretch or ‘butterfly stretch’.
d. Wrong, jumping up and down for ten seconds is not a static stretch. However, given the right movements and position this could be seen as a dynamic stretch.

4. What types of movement does dynamic stretching involve?
a.    Uncontrolled spinning in circles
b.    Fast whipping of the legs and arms
c.    Jumping and rolling on the floor
d.    Controlled bounces and swings *

Feedback:
a. Wrong, uncontrolled spinning in circles is not dynamic stretching. This will most likely make you dizzy and disoriented.
b. Wrong, fast whipping of the legs and arms is not dynamic stretching. You could possibly tear a muscle and injure yourself.
c. Wrong, jumping and rolling on the floor is not dynamic stretching. Rolling on the floor is reserved for situations where you catch fire.
d. Correct, controlled bounces and swings are the types of movements involved in dynamic stretching. Be sure to warm up before performing dynamic stretches.

5. One would measure their resting heart rate by using
a.    beats per second (BPS)
b.    beats per half-hour (BPH-H)
c.    beats per minute (BPM) *
d.    beats per hour (BPH)

Feedback:
a. Wrong, beats per second is not a standard unit of measurement for heart activity. You would most likely count 1 to 3 beats in 1 second, so you would not get an accurate heart rate.
b. Wrong, beats per half-hour is not a standard unit of measurement for heart activity. The number of beats would be too large.
c. Correct, beats per minute (BPM) is a standard unit of measurement for heart activity. To calculate your resting heart rate, count the number of beats in 15 seconds and multiply by 4.
d. Wrong, beats per hour is not a standard unit of measurement for heart activity. This would be much too long of a measurement. You would probably lose count or waste a lot of your  valuable exercise time.

6. How would one calculate their maximum target heart rate?
a.    Calculate resting heart rate and multiply by 4
b.    Subtract your age from 220 (men) / 226 (women)
c.    Karvonen method
d.    Both b and c *

Feedback:
a. Wrong, multiplying your resting heart rate by 4 is not a formula to determine maximum heart rate (MHR)
b. Wrong, this is one of the ways to calculate your MHR.
c. Wrong, this is another way to calculate your MHR. It is a longer formula, but it is the most accurate.
d. Correct, both ‘b’ and ‘c’ are correct.

7. Which of the following is true about warm ups?
a.    Warm ups allow the athlete to identify and current illnesses or injuries
b.    Warm ups should only be performed before strenuous activity
c.    Warm ups are only beneficial for seasoned athletes
d.    Warm ups prepare the body and mind for physical activity
e.    All of the above
f.    Both a and d *
g.    Both a and c

Feedback:
a. Wrong, this is a true statement about warm ups, but ‘d’ is also true.
b. Wrong, although it is important to warm up before strenuous activity, warming up before any physical activity is recommended.
c. Wrong, although it is important for seasoned athletes to warm up properly, non-athletic people need to warm up too.
d. Wrong, this is a true statement about warm ups, but ‘a’ is also true.
e. Wrong, ‘b’ and ‘c’ are false.
f. Correct, both ‘a’ and ‘d’ are true.
g. Wrong, ‘a’ is true, but ‘c’ is false.



Got those answers straightened out?

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